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Stormwater Management

The cities we live in are a bigger source of pollution than all of our factories put together. In fact, stormwater runoff is the single greatest threat to our water quality and watershed health nationwide. More than 40% of all our nation’s waters fail to meet water quality standards for their designated use as a source for drinking.

Historical industrialization and urbanization of the Rouge River left the watershed in severely degraded condition. In 1987 Wayne County implemented an illicit discharge elimination plan (IDEP) and in 1989 a Remedial action plan (RAP) was implemented for the Rouge, along with the first Voluntary Watershed based General Storm Water Permit”, which was eventually adapted for use as a statewide permit. Fifty communities participated in the watershed planning efforts, although only 45 were actually in the watershed. As part of this effort, advisory committees were formed and the seven sub-watershed groups eventually evolved into the “Alliance of Rouge Communities (ARC). This was the model for what is now the national Stormwater Permitting Program.

Although initially School districts had the option of being “nested” within these permits, the nature of the requirements and arrangement of “no liability” for the nested districts complicated the inter-relationship of cooperation. Because School districts have the potential to contribute significantly to non-point source pollution within the watershed, it was recently determined that the highest degree of water quality and reparation to impacted waters would be most efficient and effective if the schools adopted individual general permits.

To Report an Illegal Discharge or Concern:
Please contact the Operations Department at (248) 865-3684

Stormwater Update

Arch Environmental Group recently conducted a round of Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) sampling at the district’s facilities on September 11, 2017-June 8, 2019 for the Kent Lake (Huron River Watershed) Phosphorus TMDLs and Rouge River Watershed E. coli TMDLs, in accordance with the applicable NPDES Permit requirements. The results of the sampling are outlined in the linked reports. The sampled location will be re-assessed twice per permit cycle.

4.5.1 Prioritized TMDL Best Management Practices

E. COLI/BIOTA

  1. WEBSD will use its website to provide the public with information regarding pet waste (SEMCOG links).  Additionally, SEMCOG pet waste posters are placed at various school buildings.
  2. WEBSD will prohibit illicit discharges, inspect and monitor suspected illicit discharges, and enforce elimination of the illicit discharges and connections. 
  3. WEBSD has reviewed all facilities for cross-connections between the sanitary and storm sewer systems.
  4. WEBSD will conduct bimonthly inspections of parking lot and curb areas and hand clean as needed.
  5. WEBSD has established programs for soil erosion and sediment control from new or redevelopment construction. Such developments require permits and inspections for practices to keep exposed soils on site or controlled from runoff.
  6. WEBSD has implemented routine visual inspections of stormwater structural controls.
  7. WEBSD will remove excessive sediments from structural sediment removal systems to maintain the maximum designed performance. Sediments will be disposed of offsite in accordance with Parts 115 or 121.

PHOSPHOROUS

  1. The use of Phosphorous containing fertilizers is restricted for use at all WEBSD facilities (unless soil testing indicates the necessity of adding phosphorous). In addition, all fertilizer use is restricted to athletic fields and/or areas designated as “curb appeal”.
  2. WEBSD will continue to use its website to provide the public information regarding pesticide use, pollution prevention, soil testing, stream buffers, and lawn fertilizers.
  3. WEBSD will continue to use its website to provide the public with information on “school” carwashes.
  4. WEBSD will continue to use its website to provide the public with information regarding pet waste. Additionally, SEMCOG pet waste posters are placed at various school buildings.
  5. WEBSD has established programs for soil erosion and sediment control from new or redevelopment construction. Such developments require permits and inspections for practices to keep exposed soils on site or controlled from runoff. WEBSD conducts routine visual inspections of stormwater structural controls.  WEBSD will remove excessive sediments from structural sediment removal systems to maintain the maximum designed performance. Sediments will be disposed of offsite in accordance with Parts 115 or 121.

ALL TMDLs

  1. WEBSD will continue to use its website to provide the public information regarding local TMDL issues (phosphorous, E.coli, and biota TMDL Best Management Practice).
  2. WEBSD will continue to educate staff, faculty, and students using various venues including the “Seven Simple Steps to Clean Water” program educational materials developed by the various watershed groups specifically related to these issues on the stormwater management webpage.
  3. The district passed a post-construction stormwater board resolution to require implementation of the stormwater standards for construction.
  4. Adequately maintains vegetation around stormwater facilities, ditches, and ponds.
  5. Provide training to applicable staff and confirm training from contractors including restrictions on the use of phosphorous containing fertilizers, soaps, cleaners and other chemicals that could impact the separate storm drain system.